In the News


Stanley Lubman in the news:



Reform needed in how Chinese judges think

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, Nov. 7, 2016

Wrongful convictions are well-known examples of some of the egregious problems in the criminal justice system. Professor He Jiahong, of Renmin University in Beijing, documents a number of wrongful convictions, such as the case of one man executed for the murder of a woman who was discovered to be alive six years later.


China’s new law on international NGOs—and questions about legal reform

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, May 25, 2016

The thrust of the new law is very clear: It is consistent with a vigorous neo-Maoist campaign launched by President Xi Jinping against foreign ideologies and other influences on Chinese social and political development, and is intended to strengthen control by the Chinese Communist Party over Chinese society.


Political psychiatry: How China uses ‘Ankang’ hospitals to silence dissent

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, April 19, 2016

Notably, human rights groups have long charged that one of the crudest examples of illegality in Chinese criminal procedure is the political use of psychiatry to detain, imprison, and forcibly medicate dissidents and activists.


China’s highest court eyes judicial reform, while a lawyer criticizes TV confessions

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, March 11, 2016

Mr. Zhu has criticized the common practice of using televised confessions, which are used “to humiliate human rights advocates, lawyers” and others as part of the current crackdown launched by President Xi Jinping. Dozens of televised confessions have recently been broadcast before court proceedings by persons detained for stirring up trouble, corruption and endangering state secrets.


Beijing’s war on rights lawyers and activists continues

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, China RealTime blog, Jan. 23, 2016

The current crackdown appears to be a continuation of relentless pressure by Beijing to expand its authoritarian rule, which makes any of its invocations of the rule of law a travesty.


Attorney’s conviction shows Beijing’s need for social control

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, Dec. 30, 2015

In the current political atmosphere, courage to speak out for change faces heightened threat, and the party-state’s treatment of Pu serves as a tough reminder that its authority cannot be challenged by critical speech.


China’s criminal law once again used as political tool

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, Dec. 1, 2015

The criminal process remains a crude tool of Communist Party policy in China. The suppression of activists by the party-state continues with blatant repression of speech and conduct deemed dangerous to stability.


After the one-child policy: What happens to China’s family-planning bureaucracy?

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, China Real Time blog, Nov. 12, 2015

The need for a sweeping birth-planning apparatus will remain, even if the scope of its impact—including forcing abortions and sterilizations, and the imposition of ruinous fines and punishments—may be lessened.


‘Harmonious demolition’ and Chinese legal reform

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, Oct. 7, 2015

One prominent example is the oxymoron of “harmonious demolition,” which refers to removal by local governments of houses targeted for sale to developers. When local governments decide to expropriate land occupied by residents, they must obtain their agreement, but the result is often far from harmonious.


The Tianjin explosions: a signal for reform

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, Sept. 7, 2015

The massive explosions in Tianjin should challenge the state to take useful steps to improve legality, which would also enhance the legal environment needed for the promised economic reforms. Failure to do so will mean more loss of life and further erosion of government credibility. China can’t afford more Tianjin fireballs.


Lessons from Tianjin

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, August 19, 2015

Because the disaster occurred in one of China’s largest cities, with a population of 15 million, it should provoke a necessary deeper consideration of subpar worker safety conditions throughout Chinese industry.


After crackdown on rights lawyers, China’s legal reform path uncertain

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, July 31, 2015

China’s current nationwide crackdown on “rights defense” (weiquan) lawyers is the strongest assault to date on a small number of pioneers who have struggled to advance the rule of law.… The crackdown increases uncertainty about the future of law reform in China as long as Xi Jinping leads the party-state.


Dirty Dealing: China and international money laundering

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, July 13, 2015

In the midst of turmoil in the Chinese stock markets, one serious problem that may appear is increased currency outflows created by current and potential investors who would rather move their assets to foreign countries viewed as safer havens. Money laundering should be under close surveillance.


China asserts more control over foreign and domestic NGOs

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, June 16, 2015

Now, not only are human-rights groups being targeted, but a wide range of other organizations hoping to integrate needed social services into Chinese society could be affected. It is not possible at this time to predict how vigorously and selectively the Law will be applied in practice, but the message of increased repression is clear.


Chinese security laws elevate the party and stifle dissent. Mao would approve.

Stanley Lubman quoted in The New York Times, May 29, 2015

“The ideology is far thinner and holds the attention of the populace far less powerfully than before,” said Stanley Lubman. … “As a result, the Chinese Communist Party needs more institutional support than before, and may need even more. This helps to explain the attention that law has recently been receiving since Xi came to power.”


China’s exodus of judges

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, May 4, 2015

The exodus of judges is a reminder of how urgent and complicated judicial reform is for China. The quality and quantity of the country’s judges has increased dramatically since the 1980s, but a surprising number of them are choosing to leave their positions in Chinese courts due to a combination of heavy caseloads, low professional standards, bad pay and government interference – as well as the growing threat of violence at the hands of angry petitioners.


Detained female activists illustrate contradiction in Chinese law reforms

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, April 9, 2015

A month ago, Chinese authorities detained at least 10female activists who were planning to mark International Women’s Day with peaceful demonstrations. Such a contradiction – between harsh, extralegal treatment of political dissent and a vigorous effort to improve the credibility of the courts –increasingly has come to define China’s legal climate under the leadership of President Xi Jinping.


A potentially powerful new weapon in China’s war on pollution

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, March 27, 2015

A key tool for sidestepping weak government enforcement—if it is allowed to function as intended—is the country’s recently amended Environmental Protection Law, which makes is easier for environmental nonprofit groups to bring public-interest lawsuits against polluters.


Questions loom over China’s legal reform drive

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, March 17, 2015

What remains unclear is whether Chinese leaders intend to make meaningful changes within that framework to raise the quality of Chinese justice, or are merely paying lip-service to justice as they continue the old patterns of authoritarian control.


A shot at solving China’s angry worker problem

Stanley Lubman writes for The Wall Street Journal, February 26, 2015

Labor unrest is on the rise in China and likely to increase as the leadership grapples with a dangerous combination of an economic slowdown and the lack of effective institutions to cope with worker unrest. A new set of regulations put forward by one province offers a potential solution while at the same time illustrating the difficulty the Communist Party faces in effectively addressing workers’ grievances.