In the News


Pamela Samuelson in the news:



In new case, Supreme Court revisits the question of software patents

Pamela Samuelson quoted in The Washington Post, March 28, 2014

The State Street decision seemed to ignore the Supreme Court’s views altogether. Pamela Samuelson … says it’s “not possible” to square the State Street ruling with the Supreme Court’s precedents. In her view: “They didn’t like the ruling, and so they gave it a narrow interpretation. In effect, they overruled it.”


Congress in middle of Hollywood copyright clash with Silicon Valley

Pamela Samuelson quoted in Los Angeles Times, February 17, 2014
Since then, “everything has changed,” said Pamela Samuelson…. “This has become something a lot of people feel strongly about.”


A call to focus on copyright

Pamela Samuelson quoted in Inside Higher Education, October 21, 2013

Many leaders and experts in higher education “want to hide” when people talk about the possibility of Congress reopening copyright legislation. “While it is sensible to be somewhat concerned about what would happen if Congress decided to reopen” the legislation, Samuelson said, “it would be a mistake for higher ed not to say, ‘If we want to do this, these things need to be on the agenda.’ ” Generally, she said, higher education needs to be sure the fair use victories of the courts are preserved.


Abusive patent litigation only getting worse, say Google, Microsoft experts

Pamela Samuelson quoted in Communications Daily, October 10, 2013 (registration required)

Non-practicing entity litigation “wasn’t worrisome five years ago,” said Pamela Samuelson, a UC-Berkeley law professor. Then, such litigation was aimed at big companies such as Google and Microsoft, she said. “But now a lot of the assertions are coming against small companies, and [they're] having real significant operational impacts.”


Patent trolls’ put brakes on SF transit app

Samuelson clinic cited in San Francisco Chronicle, September 1, 2013(registration required)

This summer, the San Francisco digital rights group and the Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic at UC Berkeley helped significantly narrow the scope of one key ArrivalStar patent, after filing a request for re-examination.


Apple’s chances on an e-book ruling appeal are lousy, say legal scholars

Pamela Samuelson quoted in AllThingsDigital, July 10, 2013

“Apple may have a tough time getting this ruling reversed because the judge made findings of fact about the antitrust violation that appellate courts typically defer to,” Samuelson told AllThingsD. “Most reversals happen as to interpretations of the law.”


Apple says differences in publisher deals belie e-book conspiracy charges

Pamela Samuelson quoted in AllThingsDigital, June 5, 2013

Pam Samuelson … took a similar view. “It is quite possible for antitrust co-conspirators to mask agreements in restraint of trade by adopting differently worded documents,” she said. “Using identical language would make the anticompetitive nature of an agreement too obvious.”


Apple CEO Tim Cook: “The e-book case to me is bizarre”

Pamela Samuelson quoted in AllThingsDigital, June 3, 2013

As Pam Samuelson, director of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, told AllThingsD, “The DOJ would not be pursuing this case if they thought they would lose.”


House judiciary committee sets up first hearing on copyright reform

Pamela Samuelson cited in Tech Dirt, May 8, 2013

They’re starting with five witnesses, all of whom participated in the Copyright Principles Project, which we wrote about a few years ago when it came out…. Having Samuelson on the list is the key one, as she was the driving force behind the project and is one of, if not the most, knowledgeable folks concerning copyright issues around.


Aaron Swartz: Opening access to knowledge

Pamela Samuelson writes for San Francisco Chronicle, January 25, 2013

What was Internet activist Aaron Swartz thinking when he downloaded 4 million articles from JSTOR (short for journal storage), a digital library of scholarly articles, in a closet at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology? Because of his suicide this month, we will never know for sure, but one consistent theme ran through his short but brilliant career: The Internet provides amazing opportunities to open more access to knowledge. And he wanted to help that process.


Brewster Kahle’s Internet archive

Pamela Samuelson quoted in San Francisco Chronicle, October 15, 2012

“He has almost evangelistic zeal for promoting better access to information to take advantage of the opportunities that are out there,” said Pamela Samuelson, a professor at UC Berkeley School of Law. Samuelson, a renowned pioneer in digital copyright law, met Kahle about 20 years ago. “If anything, he’s become more of a visionary and more of an evangelist,” she said. “He hasn’t slowed down at all.”


Brewster Kahle’s Internet archive

Pamela Samuelson quoted in San Francisco Chronicle, October 15, 2012

“He has almost evangelistic zeal for promoting better access to information to take advantage of the opportunities that are out there,” said Pamela Samuelson, a professor at UC Berkeley School of Law. Samuelson, a renowned pioneer in digital copyright law, met Kahle about 20 years ago. “If anything, he’s become more of a visionary and more of an evangelist,” she said. “He hasn’t slowed down at all.”


Google’s digital library plan hits another snag

Pamela Samuelson interviewed by National Public Radio, September 18, 2012

UC Berkeley law professor Pam Samuelson says Google is confident enough to keep scanning. “But the sense that I have, from talking to people, is that maybe they have slowed down a little bit.”


Reforming copyright is possible

Pamela Samuelson writes for The Chronicle of Higher Education, July 9, 2012

The fastest way to achieve a more comprehensive digital library is for Congress to create a license so that digital libraries could provide public access to copyrighted works no longer commercially available. This approach would make it unnecessary to engage in costly work-by-work searches for rights holders and would free up orphan works.


US-expert Samuelson: “ACTA should concern us all”

Pamela Samuelson quoted in Der Standard, May 3, 2012 (translated)

As a festival speaker for tomorrow’s opening in parliament, the U.S. American law professor Pamela Samuelson, known for her digitalization and legal expertise, will engage in a conversation about “Recognition of the Significance of Public Domain” to discuss public possession with regard to copyright on the Internet today.


A universal digital library is within reach

Pamela Samuelson writes for Los Angeles Times, May 1, 2012

Digital libraries containing millions of out-of-print and public domain works would vastly expand the scope of research and education worldwide, extending access to millions of people in undeveloped countries who don’t have it now. It would also open up amazing opportunities for discovery of new knowledge.


Serving a public that knows how to copy: orphan works and mass digitization

Pamela Samuelson, Jennifer Urban, Molly van Houweling, Jason Schultz cited in Publishers Weekly, April 14, 2012

-The UC Berkeley Center for Law and Technology (BCLT) is among the most eminent study centers for intellectual property (IP) law. Coordinated by Professor Pamela Samuelson, this last week it pulled together approximately 200 highly accomplished and well-spoken legal scholars, practitioners and librarians in a small conference on orphan works, “Orphan Works and Mass Digitization.”

-Jennifer Urban of BCLT cautioned that we need to evaluate the benefits and costs of diligent search requirements, a likely component of orphan works legislation, against the costs of collective licensing, which is more of a blunt end of the rights hammer, but would obviate the need for individualized search.

-Molly van Houweling observed that we need systems … that actively reward instead of punish efforts that produce information helping to re-unite rightsholders with their works.

-Jason Schultz noted in twitter that the key question was how people and their institutions can be part of this world, and learn to serve publics who know how to copy.


Perils of pay for play

Pamela Samuelson quoted in The Deal Magazine, March 30, 2012

“As enthusiastic as I am about copyright reform, I am not so naïve as to think that there is any realistic chance that a copyright reform effort will be undertaken in the next decade by the Copyright Office, the U.S. Congress, or any other organized group,” wrote Pamela Samuelson, a professor at University of California, Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law and a pioneer in digital-copyright law.


Pamela Samuelson Faults Guild’s Google Books Brief

Publishers Weekly, December 13, 2011 by Andrew Albanese
http://bit.ly/stYxVK

The brief in support of the motion does not address concerns about adequate class representation raised throughout the settlement process, specifically whether the guild, an organization which represents a sliver of the wide universe of authors, can effectively speak for the varied and divergent interests of “authors” writ large. Critics like UC’s Pam Samuelson, and D.C. attorney and author Scott Gant have argued there should be multiple classes all with different counsel.


Robert Merges, Pamela Samuelson Support First-to-File Patent Law

AllBusiness, September 19, 2011 by Don Sadler
http://www.allbusiness.com/finance/legal/16680947-1.html

Robert Merges, a professor of law at University of California, Berkeley, noted in a San Francisco Chronicle article that this provision gives inventors one year to hone their inventions after disclosure.

Pamela Samuelson, the director of UC Berkeley’s Center for Law and Technology, agreed: “The ‘little guy’ inventor story that this rule favors big firms is really a myth.”