In the News


Justin McCrary in the news:



Oakland: More police = less crime, Cal prof argues

Justin McCrary quoted in Oakland Tribune, May 2, 2013

Put in dollars and cents, he argued, a 10 percent increase in police staffing would cost close to $13 million but would return anti-crime benefits of close to $40 million. That’s a good investment by most private industry standards, McCrary added. “If you owned a business and someone said that if you invested $13 million and got back $40 million, every single businessman would say ‘sold,’” he said.


Berkeley Law professors to suggest ways to make Oakland safer

Franklin Zimring and Justin McCrary cited in Berkeley Patch, April 20, 2013

Zimring’s recent book, “The City That Became Safe: New York’s Lessons for Urban Crime and Its Control,” traces the declining crime rates in New York City. The book has been hailed as the most important work in criminology in recent memory. Zimring concludes that “The only obvious candidate to take credit for the city’s crime decline—was policing.”

Professor McCrary’s recent study reveals that an increased police presence has consistently been found to reduce crime. His study deems Oakland the 24th most under-policed of the 242 largest cities in the United States, and concludes that every dollar spent on increasing police in Oakland would generate $2.90 in reduced victimization costs.


Oakland struggles to cope as crime surges

Justin McCrary quoted in The Wall Street Journal, S.F. Bay Area, February 14, 2013 (registration required)

Research shows that in the long run, poverty is associated with higher crime rates, said Justin McCrary, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley, though he noted that this doesn’t explain the recent increase in crime, which he said could be linked to the smaller police force.


Study finds Gary, Indiana, nation’s most ‘underpoliced’ city

Justin McCrary quoted in Insurance Journal, November 30, 2012

“The bigger police departments are a lot cheaper to run,” he said. But the result can also mean a lost “of texture and nuance” that residents will resist when they deal with officers unfamiliar with the territory.


Franklin Zimring, Justin McCrary Examine Crime Stats

The Chronicle of Higher Education, March 6, 2011 by Lauren Sieben
http://chronicle.com/article/5-Minutes-With-Where-More/126612/

Mr. Ludwig is a gun-policy researcher and an editor, along with Philip J. Cook, of Duke University, and Justin McCrary, of the University of California at Berkeley, of Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs, forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press.

Frank Zimring is a law professor at Berkeley who wrote a terrific book in the late 90s where he points out that if you look at cities in the United Kingdom and you look at cities in the United States, the overall levels of fights and robberies and other crimes aren’t very different.


Justin McCrary Finds NY Teachers ‘Scrub’ Regents Test Scores

The Wall Street Journal, February 2, 2011 by Barbara Martinez and Tom McGinty
http://on.wsj.com/hKOkaC

A trio of economists—Thomas S. Dee of the University of Virginia, Brian A. Jacob of the University of Michigan and Justin McCrary of the University of California at Berkeley—conducted an independent statistical analysis of the data for the Journal and came to a similar conclusion. They estimated that from 3% to 5% of the students statewide who were given passing grades for the five main Regents exams in June 2009 actually failed the tests.